What I’ve been reading

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By now you’ve all probably heard of this book. Like Me, Before You, I’m probably the last to read it….and LOVE it.

In case someone else has missed this wonderfully fun story, here’s the gist. Don Tillman is a geneticist at an Australian University.Don decides to apply his scientific research and analysis skills to finding a wife. Don is a lot like Spock on the old Star Trek. Logical, unemotional. Maybe its Asperger’s? Anyway, picture Spock dating, but with a sense of humor.  He meets Rosie, a PhD student and barmaid. He realizes that he’s enjoying himself, but there’s a problem–well, two. One is, she doesn’t meet the scientifically determined criteria for a wife and the second is she’s very troubled by not knowing who her biological father is. Probably you see where this is going.

Having been socially awkward pretty much all my life, I could so relate to Don’s problems in dating. I, too, pushed the good ones away! But as you also probably guessed, things turn out better for Don than for me! This book is a delight and I’m anxious to read the sequel–the Rosie Effect. The Rosie Project: A Novel by Graeme Simsion.

 

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After Downton Abbey added a racing car driver I read that the story was inspired by Evelyn Waugh’s novel, Vile Bodies and figured I would enjoy reading it. Yes and no. Brideshead Revisited it is not. I did love the caustically funny names–Lord Metroland, Lady Circumference, Miles Malpractice, Prime Minister Outrage, etc. The story itself was just “ok.” He tried a funny thing that didn’t work–angels named Chastity and other virtue-names. The story is of the so-called Bright Young Things who did roaringly funny and fun things like treasure hunts that involved stealing a Bobby’s police helmet.

They were so utterly full of themselves, of booze and of money that you had to be one of them to stand them. Think most obnoxious fraternity on campus and multiply it by at lest 7.  I did like Adam and Nina and Agatha though. The rest…well, at least it isn’t a very long book. It did make me want to re-watch the 1970’s Duchess of Duke Street about the hotel and it’s owner fictionalized in this book, too. Rosa Lewis ran London’s Cavendish hotel as the playground of invited aristocrats only. That part was pretty amusing too.Sadly, as it was released in 1930, it does predict the next war, but because of the real war that little part doesn’t stand the test of time.

There are better books by Waugh, though,  if you are interested in his work. Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh.

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I mentioned this book in last week’s First Lines post. This was another fun read. A little girl is born to two foodies–one a chef the other a sommelier and the mother cannot cope. She leaves and the story goes on from there. The girl, born with a once-in-a-generation palate for food and wine, but grows up knowing neither of her parents. This story takes interesting side trips, explores a few fascinating rabbit trails and ultimately comes to the not stereotypical conclusion. I thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to more of this author’s work. It was enhanced by having a reader (audio version) who had the regional accents perfect. A fun read or a great gift for your favorite foodie. Kitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal.

 

What have you been reading? Leave me a link or a comment.

 

 

 

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