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Review: Some Tame Gazelle by Barbara Pym

 

“Something to love, oh, something to love!” “Some tame gazelle or some gentle dove, Something to love, oh, something to love.”

(Donall Dempsey)

My Interest

Since picking up Pym’s Excellent Women last year, I’ve been on a quest to read all of her books. Her stories are compared to those of Jane Austen. I agree. Comedies of manners are always fun–especially for me since I love social history. The sly, dry, humor. The occasional &ictchy comment. And, oh the delicious shade thrown! The side-eyes! The resting &itch faces! Then too, in one of my [yet-to-be-published) novels I have an Agatha who is a Bishop’s daughter. You read it here first. I created my Agatha about seven years before I read this book!

“…as the wife of an Archdeacon she always had very good clothes which seemed somehow to emphasized the fact her father had been a Bishop….[X] would look odd in a familiar old-fashioned grey costume whose unfashionably narrow shoulders combined with [her] broad hips made her look rather like a lighthouse. Her relation Miss {Y] would wear a fluttering blue or grey dress with a great many scarves and draperies and she would as always carry that mysterious little beaded bag without which she was never seen anywhere. …the most magnificent person there would be Lady Clara…who was to perform the opening ceremony. It was, of course, fitting this should be as she was the daughter of an Earl and the widow of a former M.P., an excellent man in his way, although he had never been known to speak in the House [of Commons] except on one occasion when he had asked if a window might be opened or shut.”

This is a great example of her Pym’s style. I love the way each lady is “given her due” as though she were a balloon being pricked by a pin!

The Story

“Spinster” sister Belinda and Harriet live in a quiet country town. Well-educated, they have reached a “certain age” and they are comfortable in their spinsterhood. Oh, Poor Belinda has her old boyfriend nearby and dotes on him. Sadly, he married someone else. And Harriet dotes on each young curate in the parish in turn. Suddenly, their world, and their peaceful spinster lives, are threatened by visitors.

“Good wine and old books seem to go together.”

My Thoughts

“Nearly twenty-past one!’ said Harriet, as they sat down to their meal. ‘The Archdeacon has delayed everything. I suppose he imagined Emily would be cooking.’ ‘I don’t suppose he thought about it at all, men don’t as a rule,’ said Belinda, ‘they just expect meals to appear on the table and they do.”

Each Pym book that I read ends up being my favorite. I loved this story! The discussions of hand-knitted socks, of darning, of grafting heels! Loved it. The watered-down canned soup that tastes like the “fermented native porridge” according to the Bishop from a thinly disguised Malawi/Zambia/Zimbabwe (then The Federation of Nyasaland, and [Northern and Southern] Rhodesia). I could well imagine to what he was referring. It was called “Chimbuku” and it was a local “beer” that tasted like vomit mixed with dirt. The shade!

s-l300

I wish my audiobook had had this cover–it’s so much more in keeping with the book which gave so much thought to esthetics, and higher learning.

My Verdict

4.0

Such a good read that I may have to break with my decision not to re-read books any more and enjoy it all again.

9 thoughts on “Review: Some Tame Gazelle by Barbara Pym

  1. I have never read this author but after reading your review, I definitely should! Sounds fascinating and totally enjoyable.

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  2. Enjoyed your review. Its been a while since I read this one and you’re making me want to revisit. I just read a bio of her via NerGalley which I also enjoyed very much

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