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From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

riverLike Paul Theroux, I served in the Peace Corps in Malawi. His short story, The Killing of Hastings Banda (1971), was practically required reading before embarking for service. (I read it on microfilm at a university library.) His National Geographic article on his return to Malawi came out while I was serving there. A few years ago, he wrote a novel set in current-day Malawi, on the way the country has fared since Independence. This quote is from that novel, The Lower River,

[His marriage was over…] “he missed the eventlessness of it, his old routines, the monotony that had seemed like a friend. ” (p.17).

Possibly the best description of true marriage–the joyful sameness of it–or, depending on your outlook, the drudgery of the monotony.

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From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

german“At our house we have damask cloths, crystal, and sterling too, but I can’t remember my mother ever using them. Anyway, I know she’s never cooked a dinner like Grandma. Now [our cook] is a very good cook, too, but it’s not the same. It’s still like eating somebody else’s food, while Grandma’s is like finally coming home.” (p33).

” [On the drive home]...next to me was a whole bag of her freshly made cheese and onion knishes. I breathed in deep. It was as though I had just left home and was now going to where I lived.” (p.38).

The first quote is why I don’t always enjoy eating out. The second is exactly how I felt leaving MY grandmother’s house when we were stuck living in an apartment for two school years. Interesting how books can speak to us and validate our thoughts.

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From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

cpbook

So much to love in this story! I have several delicious quotes in my Commonplace Book from it. Here are a few samples.

“…she was scared she couldn’t actually live her own life.”

“…the hardest times in life where when you were transitioning from one version of yourself to another.”

“She didn’t have to become the crazy that was her family.”

“…wondered if there was a form of mental illness that wasn’t biological, but learned.”

Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen