From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

“…if it were possible to render sorrow it would look like a November gale….”

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From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

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I am currently reading and/or listening to this fabulous book with my friend Silvia’s Gray House Book Club group, though I am not keeping up.

Why the Quote Appealed to Me

This quote echos the same hopeless, senseless lives that so many “have-nots” live today–those who see prison as maybe not “normal,” but no big deal. No reason to prepare for life–you just end up with nothing. Those who see cutting now as an adolescent rite of passage, drugs just cheap recreation and “getting over” the only thrill left. A weird sort of almost nihilism.

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The Quote

They are always hostile, always hungry, always covered in spots from the sweets they consume to cheat hunger. They dye their hair and alter their pants with multicolored patches. Red is hopelessly older. Not in years, but in questions he asks himself. Young Rats are not concerned about tomorrow. Their life begins and ends today. It is today they need that extra piece of toast, it’s today they need that new song, it’s today they need to take the only thing that’s on their mind and scrawl it in huge letters on the bathroom wall. Rats suffer from constipation but they’d still eat anything anytime. And fight over food. And over who sleeps where. And after the fight is over they’d listen to more music and eat again, with even more delight. 

(Kindle Version, p. 424)

 

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From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

 

Today I’m joining in with a fun link-up that shares favorite quotes from the week’s reading. What a great way to discover new blogs and new books to enjoy! Thanks to Lisa @ Bookshelf Fantasies for hosting Thursday Quatables.

 

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MeBeforeYou

 Me Before You by JoJo Moyes

Me Before You is now a major motion picture! Do you read the book first or see the movie first? Leave a comment. Or leave your own favorite quote from this book in a comment.

Love to keep a book of quotes? Do you scribble them down on cards or use an app? No matter, share your favorite quote from this week at Thursday Quatables.

 

From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

Yesterday I wrote about a lavish older man–younger woman wedding. Today I’ve got a quote that should make the couple feel wonderfully smug–even though I wouldn’t call the groom “old,” just quite a bit older than his bride.

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“‘Old men shouldn’t marry young girls,’ he said. ‘I disagree. If young girls marry young men, they never grow or learn … for both are equally green.'”

Antony and Cleopatra by Colleen McCullough

From My Commonplace Book: Quotes I Love

The Book:

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I just finished listening to this book–so compelling, so well-paced, so well written. Such fabulous writing that I pulled over to scribble down a few quotes. Definitely a book for the book clubs, but for once it will be one that actually gets read. I love audio books that make me sorry I’ve reached my destination. This one found me sitting in the driveway at home or the parking lot at work listening to just another minute!  Silly me! When I heard “psychological thriller,” I thought “torture, rape” and no thanks.  Happily that is not the story here. Stuff happens, but not that sort of bad. I can’t wait to read or listen to more of Liane Moriarty’s books.

 

The Quotes I Loved:

This one evoke such a feeling of dread in me–I constantly fret over this happening to me. It will, of course. It’s happened to my Mom a bit and certainly happened to her mother. Dread. Like getting my Great-Grandmother’s ham-like upper arms. Like men dread getting old guy neck and having to live in a shirt and tie to look younger–that sort of dread.

“…the drawstring of wrinkles around [her] mouth….”

 

And, this, one of the best descriptions of marriage ever written–one anyone who has spent even a day in marriage can relate to, can nod their head and Amen to.

“…marriage was a form of insanity, love hovering permanently on the edge of aggravation…”