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1944 Club: A House in the Country by Jocelyn Playfair

copy-of-1944club

I’ve wanted to participate in the X-Year Club since discovering it some time ago at Kaggsy’s Bookish Ramblings. I keep forgetting! This time, for the 1944 Club I picked The Robe, one of the year’s bestsellers. But, it was HUGE. My 50-something, phone-addled brain just couldn’t do it right now. Then, today, I read this post 1944 Club–Some Previous Reads posted by Kaggsy and realized I’d unknowingly read and reviewed a great book published in 1944 earlier this year. Hence today’s re-post with this new introduction! Click the link below to read the full review of A House in the Country, by Jocelyn Playfair, published in 1944.

Hopewell's Public Library of Life

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Cressida Chance of Brede Manor–that sounds like a fairly typical country house, Lord of the Manor, sort of book heroine, right? Well, do read on.  In 1942 Cressida has a host of interesting lodgers–billeted there for the war, of course. Household help has vanished to the factories or women’s branches of the military so Cressida pretty much has to buck up and run the whole show herself–which she does, capably, and often in trousers. The previously obligatory tweed skirt, twin set and pearls being stowed in the airing cubbord for the duration owing to lack of stockings or new girdles.

Along the way, we learn of her romance and marriage and the secrets and complications thereof. Also, understandably, there is a lot of thought on the war and how or when life will return to normal.  Or if normal ever really can return. After all, they are now engaged in…

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